Tag Archives: Encouragement

Transitions

Transitions don’t just lead into the next thing; they make an impact.

My mom spent the last several months in the hospital—not improving—not able to care for herself at home anymore.

I went to the hospital to see her before Christmas. I brought her a red Poinsettia—her favorite color to brighten her gloomy room. But it was the Diet Coke I sneaked in that brightened her eyes with excitement. I inserted her straw and helped her hold it. She gripped it tight and sipped like a delighted child. Until that moment, she’d been moaning and depressed.

Mom and I experienced another transition before I left. She told me to give her a hug. When I bent forward, she grabbed me like the coke bottle. She pulled me into a deep, tender hug and, for the first time, I felt the love she’d withheld from me all my life. In this one instant, every hurt and doubt about her love for me vanished. She held on tighter and kissed me, then said, “I wish I could go home with you.”

Teary-eyed, I told her, “I wish you could too.”

My brother and I sorted through her belongings and transitioned her to a care facility.

YOUR TURN

Have you reflected on all the transitions your life has gone through this past year? What were your reactions like? Did you stay in control? Were you unemotional?

WIP CHALLENGE

Read back through the major transitions in the life of your character/s and make sure they react emotionally, like a real person. Make your readers emote and feel connected to your characters.  

Time to Write

How strong is your desire to write?

In a 1964 interview, Harper Lee said, “Writing is a process of self-discipline you must learn before you can call yourself a writer. There are people who write, but I think they’re quite different from people who must write.”

I’ve added this topic on my vlog.

It Begins With Passion

The kind of passion family and friends accuse us of being obsessed about because we neglect them at times. We’ve stayed up too late meeting a deadline, finishing a thought, or tweaking one more sentence. Fellow writers are the only ones who understand. We follow and friend each other for support and higher social media stats.

One of my favorite quotes comes from Harper Lee’s interview by Roy Newquist, from his book, Counterpoint (1964 by Rand McNally): “Writing is a process of self-discipline you must learn before you can call yourself a writer. There are people who write, but I think they’re quite different from people who must write.”

Why do we do it? Because a passion to tell a story rose from the depth of our souls, a character from our imagination became real. We hear them screaming for help because we left them in the middle of a disaster scene when real life interrupted.

We share our WIP with others, “wanting honest feedback,” but not really. Upon hearing the truth of flat characters or disjointed, lack luster plots, we spiral into  despair. We pout, eat chocolate, and stare at the delete button, anticipating life as a normal person.

But we can’t—passion to tell the story compels us back from the brink to try again. We sigh and take a fresh look, apologize to our Protagonist, and complete the journey because we must. Maybe someday our family and friends will understand and love us anyway.